Designing for Adaptable Futures (DAF) Winners Announced

While we are struggling o come to grips with the changes wrought by the older generation of which i am one, we are often exited to see the work of the future designers of the world and how we might look afresh at our problems from bustler

The Adaptable Futures (AF) group at Loughborough University in England today announced the winners of its first international student competition, Designing for Adaptable Futures (DAF). The competition asked students to illustrate how the life of their proposal – whether product, building or urban intervention – would unfold through time: over an hour, day, year, decade, or perhaps a century.

The international jury of architects included Charles Holland, Director (FAT Architecture); Daisy Froud, Director (AOC); Megumi Matsubara, Founder (Assistant, Japan); Søren Nielson, Director (Vankunsten Architects, Denmark); David Rowley, Director (Nightingale Associates); and Paul Warner, Director (3D Reid Architects).

Joint First Prize: Factory Home by Johnny Killok from AdaptableFutures on Vimeo.

Top submissions were shortlisted, from which the judges selected three winning submissions (a joint first place and a third place) along with five submissions deserving honorable mention. Overall the competition received over 150 submissions from 26 countries around the world.

VIEW THIS COMPETITION BRIEF:

Joint First Prize: Factory Home by Johnny Killok: Still from the Factory Home film: work mode

Joint First Prize: Factory Home by Johnny Killok: Still from the Factory Home film: work mode

Joint First Prize: Factory Home
by Johnny Killok (University of Westminster, UK)

Factory Home focuses on reshaping the live/work spatial relationship as part of a ‘third industrial revolution’. The proposal organizes the building as three distinct zones – living, working and transition which are blurred through the use of flexible modules sliding in and out of the transition zone as needed throughout the day. - boards (PDF)

Joint First Prize: Village Green
by Jeffrey Adjei (University for the Creative Arts Canterbury, UK)

Village Green (for the people by the people) in New Addington proposes several ideas about how to construct transient social structures for a high quality public space which evolve with community needs. The proposal embraces Walter Segal’s concept of self-build and looks extensively at the collaborative process, linking the community with a vast network of charity and government organizations through a continual building process. -boards (PDF)

Joint First Prize: Village Green by Jeffrey Adjei: Village Green's public space

Joint First Prize: Village Green by Jeffrey Adjei: Village Green’s public space

Third Prize: Adaptable Street 
by Maxime Rousseau and Paul Jaquet (Université de Montréal, Canada)

Adaptable Street focuses on exploiting (and expanding) the capacity in our major cities to create and adapt spaces at and around street level, creating ‘thick streets’ for a vibrant mix of uses. The proposal explores how the uses and spaces would transform linearly, seasonally and over time. - boards (PDF)

Third Prize: Adaptable Street by Maxime Rousseau and Paul Jaquet: Sections through street

Click above image to view slideshow
Third Prize: Adaptable Street by Maxime Rousseau and Paul Jaquet: Sections through street

Regarding the winning submissions, Daisy Froud of AOC stated; “I’m really glad that the two joint winners reflect two very different approaches, one more traditionally architectural – it’s a big building with bits that slide, but that is nonetheless rooted in thinking about how people in central London live and work – and one that has more in common with social sculpture, its speculations based on research into a specific cultural and perhaps even ‘small-p political’ context.”

Jury members were inspired by the quality of the visual and narrative ideas presented. David Rowley of Nightingale Associates commented: “I was impressed by the time and effort many of the students put into the submissions, and how effectively they showcased their ideas using both presentation boards and film.  The best submissions fully embraced adaptability with sustainability in its broadest sense, taking into account social and political factors as well as accounting for the visual environment and longevity.”

The integration of time in their design proposal was framed around three criteria presented in the brief: strategies for change (AF frame cycle), building layers and design guidelines (spatial, material and mind set).

Students were allowed to submit two A0 boards and/or a three minute film. The three competition winners will share a £3,500 (US$5,433) cash prize and have been invited to participate and present at this autumn’s AF event in London.

The jury also awarded Honorable Mentions to following five projects:

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About Urban Choreography

Landscape Architect specializing in the experience design of Retail, Leisure, Urban , Landscape Environments Currently researching for a PhD registered at Urban Observatory, University of Cape Town in Integral Urban Dynamics and City Modeling
This entry was posted in Events & Gatherings, Industrial Design, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Designing for Adaptable Futures (DAF) Winners Announced

  1. Pingback: Designing for Adaptable Futures (DAF) Winners Announced | concerturbain

  2. Pingback: Designing for Adaptable Futures (DAF) Winners Announced « Things I grab, motley collection

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