The High Line- An Urban Oasis in New York via thisbigcity

In thisbigcity Joe Peach has posted this tribute to one of urban restorations ‘success stories’ at least as it is being recognized in conventional American media – here by National Geographic.  Designed by James Corner Field Operations (project lead) and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, after winning a well publisized competiton for The City of New York / Friends of the High Line, it has won numerous awards including ASLA Honor Award 2010 The High Line, Section 1

The High Line – An Urban Oasis in New York

Images courtesy of Diane Cook and Len Jenshel and taken from the April 2011 edition of National Geographic magazine – on the newsstands now.

“Originally intended for demolition during the Giuliani administration, New York’s High Line has instead gone on to become one of the city’s most iconic public spaces – an impressive feat when considering what the city has to offer. Despite battling resistance throughout the design stage, this former elevated rail line somehow made the transition into a realised project, and the city is a better place as a result. The April issue of the National Geographic explores the High Line in more depth, along with some beautiful photos, some of which they have kindly allowed This Big City to reproduce:

Parks in large cities are usually thought of as refuges, as islands of green amid seas of concrete and steel. When you approach the High Line in the Chelsea neighborhood on the lower west side of Manhattan, what you see first is the kind of thing urban parks were created to get away from—a harsh, heavy, black steel structure supporting an elevated rail line that once brought freight cars right into factories and warehouses and that looks, at least from a distance, more like an abandoned relic than an urban oasis.

 

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