Bill Moggridge 1943-2012

Bill Moggridge one of the design worlds greats has passed on after an inspirational life as foundering member of IDEO and author of Designing Interactions 2007 – and Designing Media 2010 here is  tribute to his life from dezeen

Bill Moggridge 1943-2012

Dezeen News: Industrial designer Bill Moggridge, who created the first laptop computer, co-founded global design company IDEO and more recently was director of the Cooper-Hewitt museum in New York, has died aged 69.

Moggridge’s pioneering work on early laptop computers earned him the 2010 Prince Philip Designers Prize. Earlier that year he was named director of the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York.

Design Museum App Collection: computers

Hear Design Museum director Deyan Sudjic talking about Moggridge’s  1984 GRiD Compass 1101 laptop (above) in our movie.

Industrial designer Bill Moggridge

Here’s a statement from the Cooper-Hewitt:


Bill Moggridge, director of the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum since 2010, died Sept. 8, following a battle with cancer. He was 69 years old. Designer of the first laptop computer and co-founder of IDEO, the renowned innovation and design firm, Moggridge pioneered interaction design and integrated human factors into the design of computer software and hardware.

“All of us at the Smithsonian mourn the loss of a great friend, leader and design mind,” said Smithsonian Secretary Wayne Clough. “In his two short years as director of Cooper-Hewitt, Bill transformed the museum into the Smithsonian’s design lens on the world, and we are forever grateful for his extraordinary leadership and contributions.”

As Cooper-Hewitt’s fourth director, Moggridge oversaw the only museum in the United States devoted exclusively to historic and contemporary design. In this role, he worked to establish the museum as the pre-eminent national design resource, enhance its profile as one of the world’s leading authorities on the role of design in everyday life and develop and present exhibitions—both real and virtual.

“During his tenure, Bill led the museum to the highest exhibition attendance numbers on record, pioneered bringing design into the K-12 classroom and dramatically increased digital access to the collection through vehicles like the Google Art Project,” said Richard Kurin, Smithsonian Under Secretary for History, Art and Culture. “His innovative vision for the future of the museum will be realized upon reopening, and his foresight will impact museum visitors and design thinkers of tomorrow. He will be greatly missed.”

“Bill’s death is a tremendous loss to the Cooper-Hewitt family,” said Paul Herzan, chairman of the board of trustees. “We will all continue to work together to see that his strategic vision is implemented.  As a designer, Bill set in motion a retelling of the story of design—its place in history and future possibilities—within the bold and interactive context of a renovated Cooper-Hewitt campus.”

“Beloved by the museum staff and the design community at large, Bill touched the lives of so many through his wise council, boundary-pushing ideas and cheerful camaraderie,” said Caroline Baumann, associate director of the museum. “A true team builder and convener by nature, his efforts at Cooper-Hewitt and throughout the design world will be forever remembered.”

Read More at dezeen

And The New York Times

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