Pop Cultitecture: The Genius of David Byrne

Combining two obsessions:  music and archi-culture David Byrne sits in the middle as a self appointed commentator on our lives and lifetimes, we have heard of our paranoia ash our obsessive lives since the seventies with Talking Heads, I remember “Life during Wartime”as especially poignant and his  collaborations with Brain Eno, “My Life in the Bush of Ghosts” spoke mysteriously of a strange in-between world and predated the mix-uped shift to Remix. In his Bicycle Diaries he explored a first person view of urbanism and in How Music Really Works gave us an insiders view of music and the music industry now  in Archinect Julia Ingalls sets forth..

"It's a multi-purpose shape – a box." Byrne as "The Deadpan Docent" in "True Stories".

“It’s a multi-purpose shape – a box.” Byrne as “The Deadpan Docent” in “True Stories”.

Unlike those architects who long to be thought of as artists, Byrne is an artist who loves to thinks about architecture. Like the deadpan docent of the infrastructural realm, David Byrne’s work has inadvertently helped make architecture into a pop culture staple. While his commentary may not be mind-blowing to an architect, the method of his commentary – the diversity and size of his audience, the innovative visual and aural techniques in which he conveys highly abstract concepts – is a major contribution to architectural discourse.

Very few popular songwriters have as many instantly hummable, building-oriented tunes in their catalogues as David Byrne. It’s way beyond “Burning Down the House”; take a closer look at the entirety of Byrne’s 38-year output, working with Talking Heads, Brian Eno or any of a dozen other musical collaborators. Instead of writing love songs that focus on interpersonal rapture, Byrne tends to frame his romanticism in potentially isolating structures: dry ice factories, wartime brownstones, shotgun shacks. Byrne’s lyricism is usually never content to celebrate love between people; it’s a celebration of love between people and structures. Notably, the way structures and spaces influence relationships isn’t a tract in an out-of-print textbook but a danceable groove.

David with bike and organ at Aria, Minneapolis, MN 2012. Image via davidbyrne.com.

David with bike and organ at Aria, Minneapolis, MN 2012. Image via davidbyrne.com.

In tracks “Don’t Worry About the Government”, “Cities”, and “Strange Overtones”, Byrne explores the buoyant (if misguided) expansionist mindset of late capitalism, the suburban isolation resulting from utopian mid-century urban planning, and the Great Recession-era social retrenching. “Don’t Worry About the Government” places the joy of work and life firmly in the hands of expanding infrastructure; Byrne makes comparisons between civil servants and his loved ones, although his main focus is the inherent power of the building itself: “my building has every convenience / its gonna make life easy for me.”

My building has every convenience

It’s gonna make life easy for me

It’s gonna be easy to get things done

I will relax alone with my loved ones

– Don’t Worry About the Government, Talking Heads, Talking Heads: 77 (1977)

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Teen Playground, KATOxVictoria, Slangerup Denmark, 2013 – Playscapes

In 2013 KATOxVictoria was selected as 1 of 4 young Danish architecture offices tasked with realizing a Danish project that had been proposed by local citizens, and moving from idea to installation in just three months with a limited budget.  They met the challenge in Slangerup, about an hour from Copenhagen, where the local youth – Read the rest…

Source: www.play-scapes.com

Teen playgrounds are rare, this one done with full involvement ( note not "participation")  of the real end  users, is remarkable – have look at the links to get the full documentary and construction photos

Project for Public Spaces | WHAT Makes a Successful Place?

Great public spaces are where celebrations are held, social and economic exchanges take place, friends run into each other, and cultures mix. They are the “front porches” of our public institutions – libraries, field houses, neighborhood schools – where we interact with each other and government. When the spaces work well, they serve as a stage for our public lives.

 

What makes some places succeed while others fail?

 

In evaluating thousands of public spaces around the world, PPS has found that successful ones have four key qualities: they are accessible; people are engaged in activities there; the space is comfortable and has a good image; and finally, it is a sociable place: one where people meet each other and take people when they come to visit. PPS developed The Place Diagram as a tool to help people in judging any place, good or bad…

Source: www.pps.org

Building Community – Summer Masterclass 2014 – GEHL Architects

This is the second summer that Gehl Architects has hosted the ‘Tools for Change’ masterclass in our Copenhagen office. Having just completed the two day session, we are once again astonished by the breadth of international participants. In 2013 we were joined by professionals from 11 countries, this year that number has increased to 13…

Source: gehlarchitects.com

rod hunt illustrates 10 ikea families + their homes for russian campaign – designboom | architecture & design magazine

ondon-based artist rod hunt has drawn a huge illustration of ten different families & their apartments for the latest russian campaign for IKEA.

Source: www.designboom.com

This is how Ikea sees rich Russians becoming urbanised western consumers and rolling the loot back to their tax free havens!