What Is Your Water Footprint?

An interesting visualisation of water footprints around the world from Protein

What Is Your Water Footprint?

 

Harvard Graduate School students of Architecture and Design Nickie Huang and Joseph Bergen’s latest project gives a visually compelling insight into the extremity of water footprints throughout both the developed and the developing world. Entitled What Is Your Water Footprint? and creating using a combination of Adobe Flash, Illustrator and Textmate, the interactive map incorporates an extensive range of data-sets with both factual and statistical information regarding the water resources available to different countries and individuals therein.

Although nothing new, data visualization has gained an increasing amount of popularity over the past few years, the visualizers remark on the power of the data visualization as a communicative medium, especially in the sense that almost anything can be reduced to a set of data. Moreover, the project is completely dynamic in the sense that, based upon the understanding that there are certain gaps in the datasets, users are invited to e-mail the designers if they feel that they can contribute to the accuracy of the visualization. The full project can be viewed here.

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Tools for Visualizing Designs

A useful resource especially for those of you who commute to work by car or public transport – this one as an example which updates the possibilities of digital design : 142. visualization techniques from urbandesign podcast ;

Click here for podcast

In the past decade, good visualization tools became accessible to a majority of designers, thanks to software such as Sketch Up and Adobe Suite. Nevertheless, there is quite a bit to learn about these and other, more advanced software before you begin to use them. Bradley Cantrell shares his knowledge and experience about visualization in this podcast episode. Bradley has worked with a variety of graphic packages over the years.

Many designers get excited about and lost in graphic software functions. Bradley points out that you have to select the right software for the learning curve, computer capacity and visual affect that you are trying to achieve. The easiest software to illustrate your design is SketchUp. It also requires the least computer power to run it. If your project budget allows, then you can visualize your design in 3D Studio MAX or an equivalent high render software. Bradley points out that you have to be aware of the render time necessary for your computer to generate rendering or animation. Beginning illustrators make many mistakes; listen to the full podcast interview to find out what these mistakes are and how to avoid them.

As a result of his vast experience, Bradley co-wrote the book Digital Drawings for Landscape Architecture. The book covers in detail how to produce good-looking renderings in the most efficient way.

The ability to maintain and edit layers adds to the flexibility and editibility of digital drawings. Provided by Bradley Cantrell.
In the past decade, good visualization tools became accessible to a majority of designers, thanks to software such as Sketch Up and Adobe Suite. Nevertheless, there is quite a bit to learn about these and other, more advanced software before you begin to use them. Bradley Cantrell shares his knowledge and experience about visualization in this podcast episode. Bradley has worked with a variety of graphic packages over the years.
Many designers get excited about and lost in graphic software functions. Bradley points out that you have to select the right software for the learning curve, computer capacity and visual affect that you are trying to achieve. The easiest software to illustrate your design is SketchUp. It also requires the least computer power to run it. If your project budget allows, then you can visualize your design in 3D Studio MAX or an equivalent high render software. Bradley points out that you have to be aware of the render time necessary for your computer to generate rendering or animation. Beginning illustrators make many mistakes; listen to the full podcast interview to find out what these mistakes are and how to avoid them.
As a result of his vast experience, Bradley co-wrote the book Digital Drawings for Landscape Architecture. The book covers in detail how to produce good-looking renderings in the most efficient way.
Counturie Forest, City Park, New Orleans, LA: Ecosystems Diagram. Provided by Bradley Cantrell.
Collect all of the elements that will be in the diagram into a single plan drawing. Place ezch layer in the drawing on a unique layer in Illustrator. Provided by Bradley Cantrell.
Counturie Forest, City Park, New Orleans, LA: Ecosystems Section Elevation. Provided by Bradley Cantrell.
Illustrator offers some useful thechniques for laying out graphics on a board. This figure has images created in Photoshop and Illustrator, as well as site images arranged in Illustrator. Text and layers can be added in Illustrator once the layout has been set. Provided by Bradley Cantrell.


Ring Roads! (via Encountering Urbanization)

I’m not sure why planners don’t like ring roads: Space Syntax from UCL London indicates that the shape of most cities that grow naturally grow in a “spoked wheel” form like London and Beijing. SPACE SYNTAX UCL,

London , Connectivity Space Syntax UCL

London  is one of the coloured rings in the Rice graphic shown below,

Very nice graphic though!

Ring Roads! Ring roads are not loved by all planners, but the are certainly fascinating when compared across the world on this poster by Rice University’s School of Architecture: Rings Roads of the World. Melissa … Read More

via Encountering Urbanization